Ever Wonder Why there is a Dimple on the Bottom of a Wine Bottle?

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Last time, we learned that a wine bottle’s glass thickness, or weight, doesn’t really tell you anything about the wine’s quality. But, the thicker glass can serve to make a sparkling wine bottle more structurally capable of holding the high pressure.

Then there’s that odd ‘dimple’ on the bottom of a lot of wine bottles. What’s up with that?

While you may hear or read multiple reasons for this ‘dimple,’ it seems that these indentations, called ‘punts’ were actually put there by early glassblowers to ensure a bottle could stand on its own. Without a punt, the rounded bottle needed some other means of staying upright, including the woven straw baskets so famously associated with Italian bottles of Chianti.

It’s also thought that the punt adds to the bottle’s structural integrity, such that the thin layer of glass at the end of the glassblower’s bottle would not so easily rupture.

Regardless of the many plausible reasons for a wine bottle punt, today’s bottles are much better made. So, the punt is simply part of tradition. Except, it may be useful for sparkling wines. Giving their bottles a bit stronger structure.

But, much like the thickness or weight of a wine bottle, the type of punt on a wine bottle really doesn’t mean anything about the contents of the bottle. So, while it may be difficult to ignore the packaging of the product, try to focus your attention on the content of the bottle rather than the bottle itself. Cheers!

Behind the Cork™ - Wine of the Week

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2016 El Chaparral de Vega Sindoa Old Vine Garnacha ($14)

This wine is from the Valley of Valdizarbe, D.O. Navarra, in Spain. One of Navarra’s most historical viticultural areas. The grapes are from vines planted over 80 years ago.

After the Garnacha grapes were lightly crushed, they were cold macerated before fermentation. It was then transferred to French oak barrels for malolactic conversion. Finally, it was aged five months in new French barrels.

This is a very delicate Garnacha with flavors of red cherry and raspberry. It’s light on the tannin with moderate acidity. A nice easy wine that you don’t want to overpower with bold foods. Enjoy this one all by itself or with light fare.

Yet another wine that fits the bill to be featured in Behind the Cork™ - Wine of the Week as a great value for such a nice wine. Enjoy!


Disclosure of Wine Sample Submission: I received this wine at no cost for review. The opinions expressed are entirely my own.

Sample Provided by Rebekah Polster, Navarra Media Consultant, President 401 West Communications.


Behind the Cork™ - Wine of the Week

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2014 Ochoa Crianza Tempranillo ($23)

From the northern Spanish wine region of Navarra comes this 100% Tempranillo. It is one of six signature wines from Javier Ochoa.

Being a “Crianza” it has been aged for 12 months in American oak and then spends at least one year in the bottle.

The aromas of this Tempranillo are very mild with subtle hints of red berries.

It is medium-bodied, has firm tannin and noticeable acidity on the finish. It is lighter and more delicate than most Tempranillo and leans strongly toward the red fruit end of the spectrum.

If you prefer lighter red wines, this would be a great introduction to Tempranillo. Cheers!


Disclosure of Wine Sample Submission: I received this wine at no cost for review. The opinions expressed are entirely my own.

Sample Provided by Rebekah Polster, Navarra Media Consultant, 401westcomm.com

Behind the Cork™ - Wine of the Week

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2014 Ventisquero Grey [Glacier] Single Block Carménère ($20)

Carménère was first introduced into Chile in the mid-1800s. At that point, it was thought to be Merlot. That is until 1994 when testing showed it was actually Carménère.

While wines from Chile labeled as Carménère can contain up to 15% other grape varieties, this one from the Maipo Valley, is 100% Carménère. It comes from La Trinidad vineyard and is produced as a single block wine.

This wine has intense black fruit flavors of black cherry and blackberries, peppery notes and firm tannin.

The winemaker notes state “We age our Grey Carménere for a minimum of 18 months and another 8 months in bottle, or longer…Carménere needs some oak to tame it, but the variety’s beauty is its fruit, so you can’t go overboard on the oak.”

Give this one some serious time in the decanter and serve with big, flavorful meats such as game meat or marinated beef.


Disclosure of Wine Sample Submission: I received this wine at no cost for review. The opinions expressed are entirely my own.

Sample Provided by Donna White of Donna White Communications




Behind the Cork™ - Wine of the Week

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2017 Left Coast Truffle Hill Chardonnay ($24)

This Chardonnay is from Oregon’s Left Coast “Truffle Hill” vineyard that contains four acres of European Black Truffle-inoculated hazelnut trees, shrub roses and holly oaks.

This 100% Chardonnay is fermented in 100% French oak before being aged for 10 months.

Left Coast winemaker Joe Wright states “This easy drinking Chardonnay delivers golden flower aromas of honeysuckle and elderberry accented with brown sugar. A burst of acidity on the palate is complimented with ripe pear fruit, rounded out by vanilla, coconut, caramel and butterscotch on the finish.” Well said Joe!

I found this Willamette Valley Chardonnay to be terrific. It had great flavors of baked apple and spices with just a hint of oak. A wonderful pairing with any lighter fare.

This is a really good one that deserves your attention. Look for it! Cheers!


Disclosure of Wine Sample Submission: I received this wine at no cost for review. The opinions expressed are entirely my own.

Sample Provided by Will Rogers of Donna White Communications